Best Live Diver Sea Scallops photos by Regalis Foods - item 1
Best Live Diver Sea Scallops photos by Regalis Foods - item 2
Best Live Diver Sea Scallops photos by Regalis Foods - item 3
Best Live Diver Sea Scallops photos by Regalis Foods - item 4
Best Live Diver Sea Scallops photos by Regalis Foods - item 5
Best Live Diver Sea Scallops photos by Regalis Foods - item 6
Live Diver Sea Scallops
Live Diver Sea Scallops
Live Diver Sea Scallops
Live Diver Sea Scallops
Live Diver Sea Scallops
Live Diver Sea Scallops

Live Diver Sea Scallops

Regular price $100.00

Hand-harvested scallops are increasingly rare, and these large “diver” scallops from the Massachusetts coast are some of the finest and most formidable offerings we’ve seen. Preferring to hide amidst the rocky seabed at depths of fifty feet or more, only diligent and dedicated fishermen are able to reliably capture these shellfish, elevating the scallops’ deserved esteem beyond just their excellence as an ingredient. 

Those who dive for large scallops are careful that their precise whereabouts are not too widely known, as the past several decades have seen excessive commercial fishing, increasing the difficulty and rarity of finding prime examples such as these. Presented live and in their shells, you will observe gorgeous color variation, from soft pearl to brilliant amber, and most of ours will include a vibrant orange roe sac, loaded with umami. Finally, the small green liver is a succulent element in Japanese cuisines, frequently incorporated into finishing sauces. 

To make the most of each scallop, we recommend a thorough cleaning, straining of the natural liquid, and serving the scallops in their shells. Whether roasted, seared in brown butter, or thinly sliced as a crudo, these scallops will bring intense sweetness balanced by briney, refreshing acidity. 

See below for how to clean your scallops.

Scallops are ~10-16oz each

Provincetown, Massachusetts, United States

How to clean your scallops:

  1. With an oyster knife and a clean, sturdy kitchen towel, cut away the adductor muscle to free the top shell, keeping the shell steady on the towel. Keep in mind that unlike other bivalves, the scallop will not have a completely closed shell. Be careful to keep your fingers away from the shell's opening , because the live scallop will clamp shut when handled.
  2. Carefully drain any natural liquid into a fine-sieve over a container and set aside. You can use this for pan sauces or to cook the scallop in its natural jus. 
  3. Remove the digestive gland of the scallop. Use your knife to cut the dark green belly away from the adductor muscle. Set aside on clean surface.
  4. Remove the gills by cutting them away from the mantle (the semi-circular rust-colored perimeter). The gills often have a bitter taste; discard them. Clean the shell thoroughly.
  5. Rinse the scallop with ice cold water before cooking or consuming. Make sure to pat dry before adding to a hot pan with frothy butter.